Canadian Money Forum banner

61 - 80 of 118 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,553 Posts
Care to explain what were the main problems?
Mainly that it was a student house. People would be loud late at night, leave the kitchen filthy, etc. For the shared bathroom I heard many complaints about hair in the drains and general gross conditions. One kitchen shared between 7 people leads to conflicts over fridge space. People stole things from each other's rooms.

Our landlord was also a slumlord who was a real pain to deal with. He evicted a tenant by throwing all his things onto the lawn. The coin laundry was so expensive we preferred to take our laundry to the local laundromat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter · #62 · (Edited)
Mainly that it was a student house.
I think I just mentioned the problem with younger people. Almost all of my problems were caused by people under 30. I would aim for older people. If that wasn't available they would be strictly controlled with the number one requirement to be quiet at all times. If not they're gone. I've said that about 5 times.

People would be loud late at night, leave the kitchen filthy, etc. For the shared bathroom I heard many complaints about hair in the drains and general gross conditions.
The second requirement was cleanliness and the importance of leaving a room the same way you found it. Clearly this place was haphazardly managed. They simply didn't care. That's not sustainable. Messy people should live in their own space. Its the only sane choice.

One kitchen shared between 7 people leads to conflicts over fridge space.
Fridges are very cheap. Mini fridges are about $40-60 used. Solution: Buy more fridges. Clearly there wasn't enough fridge space.

People stole things from each other's rooms.
Remember I mentioned the necessity of a storage locker?

Our landlord was also a slumlord who was a real pain to deal with. He evicted a tenant by throwing all his things onto the lawn.
Remember I mentioned the importance of amiable management with a calm attitude?
The coin laundry was so expensive we preferred to take our laundry to the local laundromat.
Well that was your choice of course. Everyone knew the cost before renting. Clearly not management's fault. Shower more and watch your laundry needs plummet.

All the points you mentioned are commonly experienced with shared accommodation. That landlord was just stupid. For single, poorer people it can be a good way to live as loneliness when living alone can be a real problem that creeps up on people very slowly over the years. I've met older guys who have lived in a house for more then 20 years. Think they don't have a tight community? Its almost impossible getting into places like that. They're run logically and fairly. And more affluent people often move into a retirement community. Not much different except its a lot nicer and costs a lot more. But the motives/results are the same. Community.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,215 Posts
...That is good news but what percentage of tenants do you think would need to get insurance to get into your building?
My experience as a renter was 100% as I had to show the policy to the landlord.


... I'm just wondering how many you lose because of this stipulation. Or is it so common in your area that most have it already?
No idea but there were far more looking to rent than rental spaces available. AFAICT, the land lord would move on to the next person.

... And what does it cost for most people to get liability insurance and can they get it without coverage of their property for a reduced cost?
Locally it's called "renters" or "tenant" insurance. For similar dollar values, it was significantly cheaper than coverage for a family home of the same size.


Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,215 Posts
Rerenting sounds like a recipe for disaster. A business model that is likely to blow itself up. I doubt the original landlord will take kindly to you subletting their property into a slum ...
When my sister picked up a sub-let for the summer, part of the owner's requirement was for both the original renter and my sister to meet with the owner's rep.

Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,951 Posts
I think just mentioned the problem with younger people. Almost all of my problems were caused by people under 30. I would aim for older people. If that wasn't available they would be strictly controlled with the number one requirement to be quiet at all times. If not they're gone. I've said that about 5 times.



The second requirement was cleanliness and the importance of leaving a room the same way you found it. Clearly this place was haphazardly managed. They simply didn't care. That's not sustainable. Messy people should live in their own space. Its the only sane choice.



Fridges are very cheap. Mini fridges are about $40-60 used. Solution: Buy more fridges. Clearly there wasn't enough fridge space.



Remember I mentioned the necessity of a storage locker?



Remember I mentioned the importance of amiable management with a calm attitude?


Well that was your choice of course. Everyone knew the cost before renting. Clearly not management's fault. Shower more and watch your laundry needs plummet.

All the points you mentioned are commonly experienced by shared accommodation people. That landlord was just stupid. Stupid is not very profitable because its not easily replicatible. The problem is people don't use what they learn to improve their shared accommodation experience. For single, poorer people it can be a good way to live as loneliness when living alone can be a real problem that creeps up on people very slowly over the years. I've met older guys who have lived in a house for more then 20 years. Think they don't have a tight community? Its almost impossible getting into places like that. They're run logically and fairly. And more affluent people often move into a retirement community. Not much different accept its a lot nicer and costs a lot more. But the motives/results are the same. Community.
This sounds like a fantasy. How do you consistently find this group of 30+ year old destitutes looking to live in a den without windows or closets, yet is quiet as a church mouse, meticulously tidy and cleans up the bathroom and kitchen immediately. Usually the people who have their **** together and are over 30 years of age are not poor enough to need to live in a rooming house. You're talking about policing tenants and evicting them without due process for being a bit noisy or untidy. Try it and get back to us with your experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,727 Posts
This sounds like a fantasy. How do you consistently find this group of 30+ year old destitutes looking to live in a den without windows or closets, yet is quiet as a church mouse, meticulously tidy and cleans up the bathroom and kitchen immediately.
I think he's looking for desperate new immigrants to exploit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Look into resort style areas and you may be able to find spots you can do something similar to this legally. Just be sure to check zoning and tenancy regulations etc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,727 Posts
He should just move to the US and do it there. He can probably exploit some undocumented immigrants who are afraid of standing up for their rights. Compared to Canada, renters in America don't have too many rights.

An added benefit of the US is that when he's eventually hauled in front of a judge, he might get lucky and get a racist/conservative judge who's sympathetic to how he exploits the poor immigrants.

Just be careful to not piss off the wrong guy. May I also suggest getting a life insurance policy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,215 Posts
I think just mentioned the problem with younger people. Almost all of my problems were caused by people under 30. I would aim for older people ...
It could be a challenge as most of the rooming houses that I have visited or lived in had few of these types.

Then too, as it was a rooming house, it seemed like half of those meeting the criteria kept up with the younger folks that were causing problems.


... The second requirement was cleanliness and the importance of leaving a room the same way you found it. Clearly this place was haphazardly managed. They simply didn't care.
Sure ... but employers who have quite the stick have similar problems with shared areas.


... All the points you mentioned are commonly experienced by shared accommodation people. That landlord was just stupid. Stupid is not very profitable because its not easily replicatible. The problem is people don't use what they learn to improve their shared accommodation experience. For single, poorer people it can be a good way to live as loneliness when living alone can be a real problem that creeps up on people very slowly over the years.
Sure ... but then again, smaller numbers has usually been the way that people start behaving properly and building community. With the past history of lots of space, I'm not sure how the contrast of needing several people per room and getting people to behave well will work out or be repeatable.


Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter · #71 ·
This sounds like a fantasy. How do you consistently find this group of 30+ year old destitutes looking to live in a den without windows or closets, yet is quiet as a church mouse, meticulously tidy and cleans up the bathroom and kitchen immediately. Usually the people who have their **** together and are over 30 years of age are not poor enough to need to live in a rooming house. You're talking about policing tenants and evicting them without due process for being a bit noisy or untidy. Try it and get back to us with your experience.
I did say any rentable room needed to have an opening window, didn't I? I think I've said that more than once. I've found 30+ people are a lot quieter and neater and more respectful than under 30 people but you're right: Its harder to bring them in. There's certainly less of them out there looking for a place. I wouldn't say I wouldn't consider younger people but I'd just screen them a lot more carefully. Especially males.
And its not about people needing to live in a cheap place. Its about people determined to save a lot of money annually. It can be thousands. If you're an immigrant bent on starting a business with no credit history so you have to use your own money this is one way of not spending much on accommodation. Ever wonder why it seems that the businesses of immigrants seem to do better on average than those of Canadians? I think its because often they are not using borrowed money. When they start their business they don't furnish the office with brand new stuff. They hunt down FB Marketplace and Craigslist and grind people down as best they can to get the best deals possible because they've sacrificed so much for that money. A Canadian will just take out a bigger loan to get new office furniture. Something that depreciates very fast and is very hard to sell later. When storms arise guess which type of business will be more willing to bend to the market, to adapt to different customer preferences?

And I'm not talking about evicting someone for leaving the toilet seat up. I'm talking about a slob that misrepresented themselves and is intolerable to live with. Basically if people can't leave a room as they found it they're difficult to live with. It sounds regimental and inflexible but its just the way it is with shared accommodation. I'm quite a messy person but I found when living in shared accommodation I changed and realized how crucial it is for everyone to do this. Plus, it not difficult to do.

As for noise, the standards for that really have to be high. People cannot read if someone is loudly talking nearby or has turned up the volume of their movie. Its just common sense when people are living in close proximity. Its why earbuds/headphones are so important.

There's another factor I was thinking about: Most people that would consider living in a high concentration environment probably aren't there much anyway. Just to sleep and eat a meal. If most people aren't there most of the time....that makes things a whole lot easier. Obviously this wouldn't work for people on assistance that are home for much of the day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter · #72 ·
I think he's looking for desperate new immigrants to exploit.
LOL...well the only ones "exploiting" others I see are those that are trying to get their own culture to rent with them! I'm just a white bread Canadian that tries to learn from other cultures. They're just determined to pay that mortgage with as much rental income as they possibly can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,951 Posts
In my experience, it is usually a couple of families (often related) living together in a house to help get each other on their feet before moving into their own housing. I'm not familiar with this rooming house situation. I'm guessing this has to be in an urban area where people don't need a car to function. I don't see how you don't end up with the dregs of society and all the problems that entails. My parents' friends owned and managed a low-end/geared to income apartment building. They kept on having to look for new plumbers to fish used syringes out of the toilets when they clogged. They ended up renovating and condo-izing the building. I would think rooming houses have very high tenant turn-over. Basically housing of last resort.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter · #74 ·
It could be a challenge as most of the rooming houses that I have visited or lived in had few of these types.
True. But rooming houses tend to be in run down parts of the city and they cater often to alcoholics that have lost their families/careers because of it. I wouldn't permit alcohol of any kind. It would simply be house rules that everyone would agree on before renting. When I specified alcohol free I actually had no problem getting people that wanted to live in my building and it was situated in a lousy part of the city, but not downtown near the bars. Personally I think a lot of people would rent in such a place if it was respectful, quiet and clean. Rooming houses are almost never respectful, quiet and clean. Remember this is shared accommodation.

Sure ... but then again, smaller numbers has usually been the way that people start behaving properly and building community.
It can definitely help.

With the past history of lots of space, I'm not sure how the contrast of needing several people per room and getting people to behave well will work out or be repeatable.
I think its smarter to focus on cultures that already do that often in family situations. They are just better mentally adapted to it. I agree its not so easy. I'm not insinuating it is by any means. The way to do it is to ease into it. First there's one to a room with any room with an opening window that can be used as a fire escape rented. Then there's 2 to a room. Then more over time as you get ideas. You know its often tenants that suggest it when they have a friend that needs a place to stay. Often the landlord is very surprised. If one was buying a house and planning this soundproofing would be an important ingredient of the renovations. But.....if there were multiple people in a room, maybe it wouldn't be as important as then it would crucial for everyone to be very quiet! What can I say....the subject fascinates me because it enables one to purchase in a much wider range of properties and still keep your head above water financially.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter · #75 · (Edited)
In my experience, it is usually a couple of families (often related) living together in a house to help get each other on their feet before moving into their own housing.
Yes, mine too. Its a new concept, definitely, to live with others in the same room, in Canada. Even small children here often have their own room! It starts so early. But in many cultures this seems very odd and would be thought to impart loneliness to the occupant to be segregated from the others.

I'm not familiar with this rooming house situation. I'm guessing this has to be in an urban area where people don't need a car to function.
The areas I'm seeing it done are nowhere near the sketchy parts. They are in lower middle class areas of the city where property is a little cheaper. But the interiors are spotless and modern. And always not far from rapid transit. But rapid transit is well done in these cities. Having a cheap bike (so it won't get stolen) and riding to the bus stop is also an option. You see that done in so many gigantic cities around the world.

I don't see how you don't end up with the dregs of society and all the problems that entails.
Well almost all dregs smoke. So just filtering out smokers gets rid of that. And most dregs don't work. Working would be a prerequisite. And most drink and this wouldn't allow alcohol. People go where they will feel comfortable. They would be repelled from all sides in my kind of place. But because of these standards I think it would also attract others longing for such a place.

My parents' friends owned and managed a low-end/geared to income apartment building. They kept on having to look for new plumbers to fish used syringes out of the toilets when they clogged. They ended up renovating and condo-izing the building. I would think rooming houses have very high tenant turn-over. Basically housing of last resort.
I agree. Most do because they have low standards for entrance. Smoking/working/alcohol standards really filter out those people. After all very few non-drinkers and non-smokers want to live around their polar opposites! I would even attempt to ban incense and candles just because they're a fire hazard! The fire in our building was caused by some daft girl high on weed that knocked over her candle! Candles are a menace and cause a lot of fires. Think of how easy it is to knock them over if they are by your bed and you move while sleeping and your comforter knocks them over. You're asleep so you don't wake up until the fire is raging. Plus people often use them at night and that's when people are most likely to be sleepy. Just say no to candles. And incense just pollutes the air with smoke. CBC just had an article the other day about how the government is trying to wake people up to the dangers of fireplace smoke, both inside and out and how it pollutes the neighborhood destroying the air for many houses around them. Some cities have banned fireplace use because of this. We can only hope it will catch on everywhere and people will really value and appreciate good air.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Discussion Starter · #79 ·
:ROFLMAO: I was going to respond but realized how ridiculous this thread topic is.
I'd sure be interested in knowing how you pay your mortgage on a rental house by the rental income in areas where the land is very expensive. Just how do you cover a million dollar mortgage with a 2 or 3 bedroom house? Its about 5 times what it would be in a sensibly priced area but unfortunately the rental income is often not even double. Its often just 50% more! So there is a problem. Pray tell, what do you suggest to bridge that gap? Because in all the comments so far, not one has offered a solution to this vexing dilemma for real estate investors. We're all ears! Because it seems that almost all investors have relegated themselves to the depressing dilemma of paying it out of their ample income in hopes of a huge capital gain in the not to distance future. Would that be a correct assumption?
 
61 - 80 of 118 Posts
Top