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are they all basically the same concoction ( in layman's' terms!), or what?
can anyone direct me to some easily-understood information on this?
 

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short answer: no
short question: define "all" ... like all for canadians or all over the world?
 

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At the present rate this will be an issue for me to worry about in say September 2021 or so.

So I will let the rest of the world sort the issue out before it might become a salient issue to me in the future.

Less tongue in cheek, it is very early days in terms of vaccine roll out in a more traditional sense. The wife of a friend was a brilliant medical mathematical statistician, now tragically passed. She made these sort of new therapy roll outs her bread and butter.

She would direct teams that would work the numbers for 5-8 years on different clinical trials, and those were for the fast tracked promising developing therapies.
 

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No idea whatsoever. I doubt very much that is as easily understood by the average person given that the virus strains are continually mutating. I certainly do not. mention Our collective knowledge of the virus is expanding as each day passes. Then there is the disinformation and the poor/incomplete reporting that seems to have taken over the media these days. Plus the self serving anti vaxer claims.
 

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I guess by "all" I mean the major ones we see in the news all the time- Moderna, Pfizer, J&J...& a couple others
Pfizer and Moderna rely on the “new” mNRa technology. I think some of the others ([email protected], Astra?) rely on traditional tech that inject some of the virus in you. The older tech versions tend not to have the same refrigeration requirement.....although Pfizer is now saying that theirs doesn’t require such extreme colds as previously thought.
 

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Jargey, if you want a lot of technical info that I doubt you will understand, nor do I, you could simply google it.

The simple answer is that the 4 main vaccines are different, in either significant technical differences or at least in some small differences in manufacturing. That said, they are all the same in one repect: They generate an immune response that tends offer lasting memory to the corona virus for at least 6 months, that we know about, and I would suspect that could almost be increased to a little less then a year by now. The most important feature, that all the vaccines seem to have in spades. They are safe. Sure more time is useful but from what we know, they will not hurt you.

Other then that they all come with different efficacies, but so far, I have tended to see the differences to be mainly the result of the number of doses, but some research from Israel is starting to indicate that they might be caused by the technical differences.

I suppose if I was offered a choice of any vaccines, I would probably go, Pfizer, Moderna, JNJ, Astrazeneca, in that order. That is mainly because if your next vehicle was going to be paid for by the government and they offered a choice of either a Mercedes Benz or a Ford Fiesta, I suspect the Mercedes would be in high demand, when either car is a pretty good deal to receive for free for anyone.

As for efficacy. If I was 65 or older I would try to wait until some Pfizer or Moderna vaccine was available. The increased efficacy is really only useful to someone who is currently vulnerable. The rest of our population will get more protection then they need from any of the vaccines. So I would take the first one offered to me (I am 56).
 

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So I would take the first one offered to me
I'm about same age, and I'd too (except Chinese one)... as I prefer traditional technology (not a new mNRa technology), I'd prefer to get JNJ or Sputnik .
My mom is 75 and she has same opinion as me
 

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I am not sure I understand enough to talk about this aspect, but I will be curious to see if one of these vaccines responds better to the new variants then the other. Not because of an attempt to find the vaccine that deals with the variants we are concerned with better, but as a test to see how a vaccine developed for one variant deals with the other.

I wonder if creating a vaccine that is based more on the spike proteins, as opposed to the whole virus itself, might work better when confronting that particular virus mutation, but worse when confronting new virus mutations that are said to have spikes that are so different they make it more infectious. It would seem to me a vaccine based on more parts of the virus (whole virus) would perhaps offer better protection against all mutations but maybe with the cost of a little less protection against the original virus mutation.

It is too early to tell and I can imagine that if there was any logic in what I just said above, the people developing these technologies, right from the start (long before covid) would have been looking at that very issue. Mutating viruses is nothing new. So I am assuming for now, there will be little discernable difference, as more info comes out, but it doesn't hurt to keep my eyes open for it anyway.
 

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Can you take them all..........just to be on the safe side ?
 

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Why would you want to take them "all"? Did you take 2 shots (=2 types) of the annual flu last year?

Not to be sarcastic here, I would be happy to get the first dose when it becomes available ... right now, we (general population in Canada) just have wait patiently. No choice.

Just for fyi ... if you're interested to hear, relatives of mine (senior & non-seniors) in the USA got their first dose of the Pfizer vaccine. With first dose, no complications other than a sore arm for both groups. ... wait ... until the 11th day ... the younger group experienced major headaches ... the older group developed a rash at the injection site. Different experiences, same type of vaccine as all live in the same city/state. They're now waiting (not quite looking forward) to their second dose.
 

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I guess by "all" I mean the major ones we see in the news all the time- Moderna, Pfizer, J&J...& a couple others
Differences are:
1) storage temperature - from -70C to -20C
2) Efficacy - from 75% to 95%
3) Doses - two for most. One vaccine requires only one dose.

And don't be surprised if you may be required to get regular annual shots just like you should for the flu.

So just like the car, they are NOT all the same.
 

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Can you take them all..........just to be on the safe side ?
No, that could be dangerous. Each vaccine has its own potential risks and side effects and if you take them all, you're adding to your risks of serious side effects.

Pfizer and Moderna (company ticker symbol MRNA) are both MRNA vaccines. This MRNA is the newest technology and in some people, might show some serious allergic reactions.

J&J uses a previously used, better established (likely safer) technology called a modified Adenovirus. It may be less effective, but still give significant enough protection to prevent serious covid illness.
 

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Just for fyi ... if you're interested to hear, relatives of mine (senior & non-seniors) in the USA got their first dose of the Pfizer vaccine. With first dose, no complications other than a sore arm for both groups. ... wait ... until the 11th day ... the younger group experienced major headaches ... the older group developed a rash at the injection site. Different experiences, same type of vaccine as all live in the same city/state. They're now waiting (not quite looking forward) to their second dose
There are reports that the second dose can be tougher on the body. People have to be careful and really take it easy (cancel all plans) when it comes time for the second dose.
 

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^ Well, I'll be hearing about the 2nd dose's effects ... hopefully none.
 

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There are reports that the second dose can be tougher on the body. People have to be careful and really take it easy (cancel all plans) when it comes time for the second dose.
I thought it was the opposite. I‘ve read about the proposed mass vaccination locations. Canada’s Wonderland in Ontario being one. They’re planning for a large part of the parking lot just to be used as a post -injection waiting site. Sit in your car for 15 mins after your shot to see if you react badly. It’s just one more factor in the logistical challenge.
 

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I thought it was the opposite. I‘ve read about the proposed mass vaccination locations. Canada’s Wonderland in Ontario being one. They’re planning for a large part of the parking lot just to be used as a post -injection waiting site. Sit in your car for 15 mins after your shot to see if you react badly. It’s just one more factor in the logistical challenge.
For the immediate allergic reaction risk, there's no difference. Whether it's a first or second dose, what those injection sites are watching for are the immediate (life threatening) allergic reaction. Personally I would linger around medical facilities for 30 to 60 minutes, and that's what I will be suggesting to my parents.

The larger reaction on the second dose is something that develops over a day or two. These are the cold/flu like symptoms as the immune system responds. I don't think it has anything to do with the X minutes of waiting post injection, but what happens to you the next few days:

 

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Pfizer and Moderna (company ticker symbol MRNA) are both MRNA vaccines. This MRNA is the newest technology and in some people, might show some serious allergic reactions. - this is why I'd prefer traditional vaccine like Sputnik with 92% protection or JNJ's one with 72% ... I know you guys have prejudice against Russia, but all of us got dozens of Russian vaccines and we are still alive :)
 
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