Canadian Money Forum banner

121 - 140 of 154 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,211 Posts
Easier if working for one of the contractors in a camp job. Much harder I would think in the client companies who need experienced folk to provide contractor oversight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
Discussion Starter #122
End of August 2019 Update

Savings and Investments
My investable assets: $1.539M. Up about $15.0k for the month.
Her investable assets (excluding DB pension): $455k. Up about $4.3k for the month.
Combined investable assets: $1.994M. Up about $19.3k for the month.

It was a pretty volatile month that started well enough, then we took a dive with the inverted yield curve and trade war drama, and then ended with a surprising recovery at the end of the month which allowed us to end up in the black instead of the red.

A light spend month combined with extra paychecks buttressed our some cash saving. My non-registered dividend holdings also did a chunk of the lifting for the month, though it was a light dividend paying month. My RRSP and TFSA were down slightly while my DC pension was up slightly only due to August’s contributions. Things are currently trending well for the year but as we all know, things can turn on a dime.
The missus' portfolio was relatively flat too with the bulk of the gain coming from the cash savings. Non-registered, TFSA, and RRSP were down, up, and up respectively but essentially flat.
In terms of USD, totals increased but at a lower rate due to loonie weakness.

Spending
August Spend: $2340
YTD Spend: $34920 (July correction and rounding)

Missed a $50 spend in July which I added back in.
August was a relatively light spend month, coming in under my $3000 estimate, even with a number of summer activities and a weekend trip. I’m guessing September should be around $3000 as it should be similar to August but with some fall league fees. However, it’s going to depend on those potential repairs we’re watching/doing around the house.
With two thirds of the year gone, barring any of the repairs becoming significant, I think we’re trending to spend about $46k to $50k this year which is kind of at the lower end of our estimates at the start of the year.

Comments, Concerns, Issues
It just got crazy again at work.
September and October look to be scary months again with all the volatility that's happening but I'm not taking any action (yet?).
I love summer in and around Vancouver.
NHL training camps are just around the corner and I'm looking forward to seeing what this iteration of the Canucks are able to do.

Countdown to Retirement
31.5 months to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
803 Posts
I heard that both spouses NW should be similar amount or very close in retirement in order to save taxes. Are you doing any tax planning to reduce your NW and increase your spouse's NW?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
Discussion Starter #124 (Edited)
That's a great question. The short answer is no, although I'm trying to understand it better.

I've been reading retirement income/decumulation strategy books and articles so have picked up on some of the concepts around spousal RRSP's, income splitting, donating shares directly, etc but I haven't been able to wrap my head around them to determine how they would best apply to our situation and how to best execute the strategies.

Complicating matters is that we currently manage things as my bucket, her bucket, and a combined spend bucket that we each contribute to, instead of a more holistic approach.
The missus also isn't looking to retire at the same time as me for a combination of reasons. She may be about 5 to 8 years later unless she gets pushed out earlier.

That said, I've run some of my projected numbers (excluding the missus') through the TaxTips.ca tax calculator and the annual tax bill, at least in the early stages (age 50 to 55) do not seem too onerous. For example, if I hit my more optimistic targets, I may be able to generate $50-65k in dividends from my Non-Registered account and also be able to withdraw $25k from my RRSP/DC Pension. It looks like that would create a tax bill of only $6680 if I'm working the tax calculator correctly. I'd be into OAS clawback territory but in some ways, that's not a key worry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
803 Posts
You could pay all monthly bills and put all of her income in investing. This will help to increase her retirement income and you may be able to save some taxes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,209 Posts
You could pay all monthly bills and put all of her income in investing. This will help to increase her retirement income and you may be able to save some taxes.
I agree with Scorpion. You're non-reg acc is substantially more than your wife's as I recall. You could have all of her income go to investing while you pay all expenses for a while to even up that imbalance in investing income.
The reasons you might consider this: Even though your larger acc can generate significant dividend income without onerous taxes, there is nothing that guarantees that will always be the case - tax rules can change (incl those related to OAS), so having your investment income closer to 50/50 provides more 'buffer'. Also, at some point you'll face capital gains, whether this is because you decide to take out some cash, or not until you die and she inherits your no-reg acc - it will come, so having a more balanced division of assets may be beneficial on an 'estate after-tax basis' (there is also nothing guaranteeing that cap gains rules won't change in the future).

Anyway, just a few thoughts. You are doing awesome btw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,211 Posts
Ditto to OMO and Scorpion. It is perfectly legal for her to invest all of her income to build investable assets while you preferentially fund all household expenses. That is an easier way (along with DC and DB pensions in the future) to income split (mostly in the future) than use of spousal loans.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
Discussion Starter #128
The suggestion is definitely a logical idea.
Throwing more money at her side of the portfolio is part of it. However, the other aspect is a combination of the discipline to invest and her just being more conservative asset allocation. She's a great saver but isn't proactive enough to invest her money. I have to nag her to contribute to her TFSA every year. She's built up a pile of cash in her HISA and I tell her it's ending up being lazy money but I hesitate to push her too hard to invest it because I'll never hear the end of it if the markets do take a big hit. I should get her to work it down though. She has some money automatically going to her PHN account on a monthly basis. Might have to consider ramping that up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,521 Posts
My co-worker has the same issue.

What he has done so far is have her funds transferred to a discount brokerage as they become available. He does the buying but of what she wants (GICs in this case). The place he deviates a bit is in the spousal RRSP where he puts up to 10% into higher income, equity based investments.

She was riding along with whatever the bank offered for the GICs so her returns, while not as good as his equity ones have improved.

He also has reduced his FI amount a bit.


Not sure if this might be an idea to pursue or not but it is one option.


Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,211 Posts
The suggestion is definitely a logical idea.
Throwing more money at her side of the portfolio is part of it. However, the other aspect is a combination of the discipline to invest and her just being more conservative asset allocation. She's a great saver but isn't proactive enough to invest her money. I have to nag her to contribute to her TFSA every year. She's built up a pile of cash in her HISA and I tell her it's ending up being lazy money but I hesitate to push her too hard to invest it because I'll never hear the end of it if the markets do take a big hit. I should get her to work it down though. She has some money automatically going to her PHN account on a monthly basis. Might have to consider ramping that up.
Fair enough. She has the ultimate authority to invest her own income as she wishes and that needs to be respected. That said, presumably both you and her invest as part of a family unit and look at the combined portfolios on a holistic basis, with some negotiation on the to and fro of what that should all look like. Maybe if she continues to insist on being more conservative, you compensate by being a bit more aggressive. Ultimately though, the overall size of your nest eggs will/should allow you overall to be somewhat balanced, e.g. 60/40, in your total investments. Her investing more and keeping you out of a higher MTR upon retirement should be some incentive to pay less tax to CRA.

P.S. Income splitting is a tax effective strategy, but it should also be weighed against personal investing styles and desires. Each member of a couple has equitable input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,053 Posts
I'm not married (so take this with a grain of salt) but I actually like the idea of two people each investing their own way. Assuming investment competence -- this is kind of like diversifying into two separate money managers.

Two people who think and reason in their own way will make different decisions. Inevitably, one will turn out to outperform the other, but (again assuming a certain level of competence) it may be impossible to predict which will actually come out ahead.

I do agree that cash drag is harmful, because cash is the one asset that is almost guaranteed to have a negative real return. But let's say one spouse wants to do 60/40 with a mutual fund, whereas the other wants to do all GICs. I really don't see a problem with that, and I like the diversification idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,053 Posts
And sorry, I didn't mean to offend by talking about investment competence. I meant that there are certain fundamentals of capital management, one of which is that cash is not an asset that performs, and is nearly sure to give a negative real return.

However, the other aspect is a combination of the discipline to invest and her just being more conservative asset allocation. She's a great saver but isn't proactive enough to invest her money. I have to nag her to contribute to her TFSA every year. She's built up a pile of cash in her HISA and I tell her it's ending up being lazy money but I hesitate to push her too hard to invest it because I'll never hear the end of it if the markets do take a big hit.
I think it's fine to remind her that cash amounts are not earning anything and losing to inflation. But no, you shouldn't push her into more aggressive investments if she wants to invest conservatively. "Investing" does not necessarily mean getting into the stock market, though that seems to be how many people use the term.

You could point her to some other conservative investment options that are undeniably better than cash, such as short term bonds (XSB or XSH) or the GIC ladder approach using 5 year GICs. Standard bond funds like XBB should also be on the table, though these come with more volatility and risk.

All of those will perform better than cash without requiring anything close to stock market risk. Speaking as a conservative investor myself, I can say that it's helpful to ease into riskier investments. My 10+ years of GIC and bond heavy investment has given me more comfort about taking on stock risk.

If she's not particularly hands on, the GIC ladder may be too difficult to manage, but XSH is worth a close look. Low MER, corporate short term bonds with a wee bit of volatility, DRIP capability, and returns similar to GICs over the years = 5 year return of 2.5%
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,211 Posts
I am guessing Milhouse has a good grip on possibilities, for each component of a diversified portfolio, and doesn't need help on portfolio design. The real challenge is juggling the priorities of portfolio independence and risk profiles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,521 Posts
And sorry, I didn't mean to offend by talking about investment competence. I meant that there are certain fundamentals of capital management, one of which is that cash is not an asset that performs, and is nearly sure to give a negative real return ...
I think it's fine to remind her that cash amounts are not earning anything and losing to inflation. But no, you shouldn't push her into more aggressive investments if she wants to invest conservatively. "Investing" does not necessarily mean getting into the stock market, though that seems to be how many people use the term.

You could point her to some other conservative investment options that are undeniably better than cash, such as short term bonds (XSB or XSH) or the GIC ladder approach using 5 year GICs ...
No idea if it fits the OP's situation but for some - this is all pie in the sky.

My father would have considered XSB or XSH the same as XIU or XIC or buying Royal Bank stock, no matter what you said to him.


My guess is Milhouse has a better read on what out of the picture and what might with time/effort might be possible.


Cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
Discussion Starter #135
Fair enough. She has the ultimate authority to invest her own income as she wishes and that needs to be respected. That said, presumably both you and her invest as part of a family unit and look at the combined portfolios on a holistic basis, with some negotiation on the to and fro of what that should all look like. Maybe if she continues to insist on being more conservative, you compensate by being a bit more aggressive.
Unfortunately we don't really coordinate our portfolios. But it has kind of just balanced out that way though as I've been more aggressive and her more conservative.

And sorry, I didn't mean to offend by talking about investment competence. I meant that there are certain fundamentals of capital management, one of which is that cash is not an asset that performs, and is nearly sure to give a negative real return.
No offense taken.

I'm fine with her being more conservative. She's pretty heavy with PHN's flagship bond fund but has eased into US and International equity funds the last couple of years.
Money matters on the earning and investing side of things aren't really of interest to her (but she watches spending like a hawk. LOL) so it's really about keeping things simple and easy for her. Hence why she's paying some higher fees at PHN for some of her portfolio.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
Discussion Starter #136
End of September 2019 Update

Savings and Investments
My investable assets: $1.546M. Up about $7.5k for the month.
Her investable assets (excluding DB pension): $463k. Up about $7.7k for the month.
Combined investable assets: $2.009M. Up about $15.2k for the month.

The volatility continued into September but in reverse, allowing us to hit new highs mid-month before falling back down at the end of the month but still providing some gains.
For me, I reached a new high of $1.57M mid-month along with my TFSA temporarily cracking the $100k mark for the first time. Although I fell back down to $1.546M at the end of the month it’s still a new high. With the exception of my non-registered account, every other aspect of my portfolio grew. My non-registered account didn’t do too badly but was impacted by a couple of key holdings that took a small hit. Dividends from the non-registered account to the end of Q3 total $26204 and is still on track to hitting $35k for the year.
The missus' portfolio had small gains in each of her accounts with a large chunk again coming from her cash savings.
Kind of cool to finally break the $2M mark in combined investable assets.

Spending
August Spend: $3130
YTD Spend: $38050

September came in very close to my $3000 estimate. We would have been closer to August’s spend under $2500 if not for a repair we kind of saw coming and an extended family lunch where we picked up the tab since my siblings typically host a lot of the family get togethers.
October should fall in closer to the $2500 mark as there shouldn’t be a lot of one off spends this month.

Comments, Concerns, Issues
Work continues to be ridiculous. I have to admit that I’ve recently tried to keep myself sane by rationalizing that I’m close enough to my goals that an early exit wouldn’t be the worst thing that can happen. The missus is also having a rough time at work too for various reasons. I’ve asked her if she wanted to consider retiring before 50 but she says she would still want to work part time.
There seems to be a lot of market negativity out there nowadays. While markets have been a bit volatile, I’m kind of surprised they have held up fairly well so far (knock on wood).
Normally we’d enjoy summer into September but it seemed more drizzly and colder than normal. Might have to consider putting on the snow tires early this year instead of waiting until late November.

Countdown to Retirement
30.5 months to go. Kind of the halfway mark of this almost 5 year countdown.
On one hand, that still seems so far away. On the other hand, when I look back at what I was doing 30 months ago, it seems so recent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
Discussion Starter #137
End of October 2019 Update

Savings and Investments
My investable assets: $1.564M. Up about $17.1k for the month. New high.
Her investable assets (excluding DB pension): $470k. Up about $7.2k for the month.
Combined investable assets: $2.034M. Up about $14.3k for the month.

October was a solid month for my portfolio with gains across the board for a new high. My non-registered account took a bit of a hit with RCI revising guidance downwards with corresponding impact to the rest of the telecoms but was offset by a heavy dividend month. My TFSA finally ended a month above $100k with my RRSP and DC Pension also having small gains.
The missus' portfolio had small gains in each of her accounts with again the large chunk coming from her cash savings. Her bond heavy RRSP’s and balanced fund heavy TFSA both had very small gains. The index ETF’s in her non-registered account provided the rest of her bigger gains.

Spending
August Spend: $2700
YTD Spend: $40750

October came in somewhat close to my $2500 estimate. A couple of unexpected spends and gifts/donations in the $100 range kind of pushed us over.
November will likely be a higher than normal spend due to some trip expenses, a potentially large ($1000 range) preventative maintenance/repair bill, and a large gift spend. I suspect November’s spend will come over $4000. I think we’ll still come in under $50k for the entire year spend unless we pre-book some significant travel for 2020.

Comments, Concerns, Issues
Work continues to be ridiculous still. I’m looking forward to a bit of a breather in December when a lot of people are off and it ends up being a time to regroup.
As we’re nearing the end of the year, I'm still hoping for a net steady as she goes with all the volatility evening out.
I finished reading Quit Like a Millionaire by Kristy Shen of Millennial Revolution. It was an interesting read with some interesting concepts. I wasn't sure if I'd enjoy it because I felt her writing style can feel a bit too abrasive based on her website. However, I generally enjoyed the read with disagreement on a couple of points.

Countdown to Retirement
29.5 months to go.
Broke the 900 days left threshold in October. The 100 days since the 1000 day threshold seemed to go by reasonably quick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
Discussion Starter #138
End of November 2019 Update

Savings and Investments
My investable assets: $1.633M. Up about $69.7k for the month. New high.
Her investable assets (excluding DB pension): $483k. Up about $12.5k for the month.
Combined investable assets: $2.116M. Up about $82.3k for the month.

November ended up being a great month for our portfolios with gains across the board. For my portfolio, it was the largest monthly increase since I started tracking monthly snapshots 7 years ago. My non-registered account gained with the telecoms recovering and ENB having a good month offsetting a couple of declines. My registered accounts had proportionally nice gains with their index ETF’s.
The missus' portfolio also had a good gain for the month but she’s had a few larger increases in the past. Biggest gains were in her non-registered account and smallest gain from her bond heavy RRSP account.

Spending
November Spend: $4220
YTD Spend: $44960

Our November spend was close to the $4000+ I expected. The gift spend came to fruition but not the maintenance/repair bill due to scheduling which will likely get it pushed to December or January. However, our travel spend essentially replaced the maintenance/repair bill with some post October trip bills and flights purchased for a 2020 trip. No Black Friday spending though, as we didn’t urgently need anything and didn’t really have a lot of time to research deals for stuff we might be interested in.

December’s always a heavy spend month for us for typical reasons. I’m going to estimate we'll spend $4750 with an expectation to keep the annual spend under $50k but it will depend on whether we make any additional pre-paid travel bookings and how much Boxing Day shopping we do.

Comments, Concerns, Issues
No rest for the wicked this December as there’s a push on a couple of initiatives to get a head start in the new year.
Curious if there will be a Christmas Rally this year. The last 2 Decembers have been down months for my portfolio. But again would be pretty happy with steady as she goes as this year’s savings and gains have now generally got me back on my original track, offsetting last year’s disappointment.

Countdown to Retirement
28.5 months to go
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
Discussion Starter #139
End of December 2019 Update, Year End Summary, and 2020 Targets

Savings and Investments
My investable assets: $1.643M. Up approximately $9.8k for the month.
Her investable assets (excluding DB pension): $486k. Up about $3.7k for the month.
Combined investable assets: $2.129M. New high.

December was posting some solid numbers for me until that last few days where the markets had a few down days and the strong loonie took some wind out of my portfolio's sails.
As a result, it was a mixed bag with a few areas up (savings, taxable account, and DC pension) and a few slightly down (RRSP and TFSA). The upshot is that my portfolio was notably higher in USD terms.

The missus’ portfolio was overall positive in December with her bond heavy RRSP ending slightly in the red.

Portfolio Targets and Goals
2019 was a great rebound year as it got my portfolio back on track after last year’s sea of red during the last trimester. My portfolio grew by just under $290k for the year which is the largest jump for me in dollar terms and second largest percentage-wise (2013 was slightly better).

My portfolio had strong gains across the board with my TFSA slightly disappointing. I broke from strategy and added TD while it was sub $70, to my TFSA, which was only supposed to hold non-CDN equity index ETF’s and a CDN bond ETF. It did ok but underperformed relatively speaking. However, I still think it’s a good long term hold in my TFSA, even at the risk of too much home bias overall.

The missus’ portfolio suffered from lost opportunity by not deploying her cash in her non-registered account. As a result, cash was heavy but she missed her non-registered account target. Her bond heavy RRSP continues to underperform expectations. We may have to review if the expectations are realistic.

For 2020, I’m looking to get/keep my Fixed Income allocation in my registered accounts to 25-30%.
For my non-registered account, I’m looking to continue adding to my Canadian dividend growers to support my $40k in dividends target in 2020.

My Portfolio
2018 Actual2019 Target2019 Actual2020 Target2022 Retirement (Rough Goals)
Cash (soft target)20.2k20k24.3k20k30k
Non-Registered689k761k835k922k1.1M
RRSP327k351k388k416k450k
TFSA82.6k93.9k103k115k135k
DC Pension237k263k293k322k350k
Total1.356M1.490M1.643M1.795M2.065M
Non-Registered Account Dividends2538035000354914000050000

Her Portfolio and Combined Totals
2018 Actual2019 Target2019 Actual
Cash (soft target)65.2k40k90.7k
Non-Registered177k231k213k
RRSP76.6k89.9k84.0k
TFSA74.8k90.7k94.5k
Misc Pension3.8k4.0k3.8k*
(DB Pension)TBDTBDTBD
Total397k456k486k
Our Combined Total1.753M1.946M2.129M

Spending
Dec spend: $4570
2019 total spend: $49.6k

December came in close to my $4750 estimate with typical holiday expenditures, eating out, and the major maintenance/repair bill that I was expecting. Travel related expenses were light and we didn’t do much Boxing Day shopping.

It was nice that we came in under our $50k soft target and under our overall $50-56k estimate. I was kind of hoping to be around $48k this year but a number of categories had larger than expected spends as explained below.
For 2020, I’m forecasting a spending jump to the mid to high $50k range due to price inflation (particularly food) and a handful of repairs/maintenance/household items. $1000 expenses add up quickly.

2018 Actual2019 Estimate2019 Actual2020 Estimate
Food & Eating Out11850127001380014500
Housing & Utilities10880125001189014500
Transportation4170450047104950
Personal6600600077808000
Entertainment1350200015402000
Travel1104012000-18000965012000-18000
Side Business610200200200
Total4650050000-560004957054000-60000

Food & Eating Out: Both our groceries and eating out were higher which I’ll partially chalk up to food inflation. However, also we covered a couple of somewhat large extended family restaurant meals which hit our bottom line.
For 2020, word is that there will be notable food inflation so I’ve hiked up our spend estimate.

Housing & Utilities: Everything was a bit more expensive this year from utilities to insurance, to property taxes, to communication services which resulted in a higher spend than 2018. We fortunately only had one significant maintenance/repair bill for the year which kept us under our original estimate.
For housing & utilities in 2020, I’m hoping some of the utility costs will level out for the year. However, property taxes are supposed to go up a chunk and there are a couple of additional repairs/maintenance things we want to accomplish in 2020.

Transportation: Our fuel spend and insurance were up only slightly in 2019. While we needed to do some expensive regular maintenance this year, we dodged a major repair. We spent more on car sharing and one of our licenses needed renewing too.
Our car may also require major servicing in 2020 (brakes). And I expect insurance costs to jump a bit as we renew for the first time under new government policy.

Personal: We overspent in personal due to a couple of key things. We went a bit overboard on some gifts/charities/gofundme's. And we had some vet bills that kind of ran up the numbers a bit.
I’ve forecast an increase in personal spend 2020 due to potentially more vet bills, some purchases we want to make, and a couple of wedding gifts.

Entertainment: Our 2019 entertainment spend was pretty similar to 2018 with the main difference coming from floor seats of a concert we attended.
I kept our 2020 estimate at $2k in case there’s more paid events we want to attend.

Travel: In 2019, we travelled on fewer but longer trips which saved us in terms airfare costs. We also cashed in a chunk of Aeroplan points for flights on a big trip.
I suspect 2020 is going to be the opposite with a bunch of shorter trips, extended weekend and week & a bit trips which should increase our travel spend.

Side Business: Side business is still there but I haven't been giving it much attention since I’m so busy at work.

House Value
2018 Assessment: $1.479M
2019 Assessment: $1.353M

According to BC Assessment, the value of our house went down again in 2019. That’s the fourth consecutive year. Again, my main concern is staying within the valuation for the home owner’s grant which we are. Still no immediate intention to tap into home equity.

Comments, Concerns, and Issues
After a great 2019, I’m not expecting similar stellar results but it would be nice to keep the momentum going.
Job-wise, it did end up being a very busy in 2019. I’m thinking 2020 is going to be busy too but just not as chaotic. That said, I think I feel more mentally ready if the company does package me out during one of its usual purges.
A big trip monopolized a lot of focus in 2019. I’ve got to see if I can give attention to the other stuff I mentioned last year: Lose weight/get healthier, throw some effort into my side business/hobby.

Countdown to Retirement
27.5 months to go.
Just over 500 days of work left after subtracting weekends, stats, and holidays.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
564 Posts
Discussion Starter #140
End of January 2020 Update

Savings and Investments
My investable assets: $1.709M. Up about $66.1k for the month. New high.
Her investable assets (excluding DB pension): $494k. Up about $7.8k for the month.
Combined investable assets: $2.203M. Up about $73.8k for the month.

Happy new year.
January ended up being big month for my portfolio even with all the turbulence: US/Iran conflict, US/China phase 1 trade deal, corona virus, and so on. Gains were across the board except savings due funds reallocated to TFSA contribution (ZAG to get the FI allocation to 25%) and purchases in my taxable account (a bit of TD). Gains were likely assisted by the weaker loonie and by a heavy dividend month.
It was a pretty similar story for her portfolio with gains across the board, TFSA contribution, and adding to her equity ETF holdings in VXC.

Spending
January Spend: $3190
YTD Spend: $3190

Overall, our January spend was reasonable. We did spend more than January 2019 but this is due to some travel spend which occurs randomly throughout the year with pre-paid bookings and whenever we decide to travel. Our food and entertainment spend was lighter due to some special event spends last year but a couple of utilities bills where higher.

February is going to be a big spend month with the advanced property tax installment due, more travel expenses, and least 1 major repair, if not 2, that we’re going to have to do. My estimate for February is a spend of about $5500 to $6000.

Comments, Concerns, Issues
January seemed to drag on forever for some reason even though it was busy at work.
IMO, the corona virus is something to be concerned about in terms of needing to ensure it is contained but from a market impact perspective I think it’s a standard temporary bump in the road.
The missus has had a rough go of it at work the last few months for various reasons. The original plan was to have her work to 50 to build up her DB pension but not starting to collect it until about 60. Might start working out scenarios with her retiring in her mid 40's.

Countdown to Retirement
26.5 months to go
I’m only a few days from hitting the 800 day to go mark. Ironically, even though January seemingly took forever, going from 900 days to 800 days seemed to go by reasonably quick.
 
121 - 140 of 154 Posts
Top